Boarding Houses

Looking for a Place to Live

Classified ads in the 1880s will make it clear how wide-spread and well established boarding house economy was.   There were  ads in every edition of every paper for decades. From Gamber’s excellent historical study:

[,,,]  if the nineteenth century was the golden age of the bourgeois home, it was also the age of the boarding house.
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The Foundling

*The Foundling plays a part in The Gilded Hour.

There were dozens of orphanages (orphan  asylums)  in New York in the last quarter of the 19th century, and almost all of them were run by religious groups. The Roman Catholic church was especially vigilant in setting up and administering orphan asylums, but the Protestant churches and the Jewish community also founded orphanages for their own children in need.[1.

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The Benedick

A gentlemen-only residential hotel on Washington Square.

From Trager, James. 2010. The New York Chronology: The Ultimate Compendium of Events, People, and Anecdotes from the Dutch to the Present (pp. 190-191). HarperCollins.

(1878) The Benedick apartment house is completed at 80 Washington Square to designs by McKim, Mead & Bigelow.

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Quinlan Family

John Quinlan (1760-1841) built a home for his family in 1840 on Waverly Place near Washington Square Park. At the time this neighborhood was on the outskirts of the city.

His son Harrison Quinlan (1799-1860) was a physician and army surgeon.… Read more.

Waverly Place

A narrow street that originates at Bank Street in the West, runs along the northern border of Washington Park, and ends at Broadway.

 

In the Waverly Place series, Anna and Sophie Savard, their Aunt Quinlan, and the Lees live at 18 Waverly Place in a large house built in 1840, enclosed by a brick wall that includes gardens and out buildings.… Read more.

Tyson’s Market

In 1883 Tyson’s Market was located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 44th Street. The story of how Mr. Tyson fought the rich and powerful to hold onto his butcher shop/tavern/corner store (found here at the Daytonian in Manhattan) gives you a good sense of how quickly things changed on Fifth Avenue.
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Vanderbilt Costume Ball

On Monday, March 26, 1883 the Ball of the Decade took place at the home of William K. and Alva Vanderbilt, in celebration of their newly finished mansion at 660 Fifth Avenue (referred to as the ). The announcement of the Vanderbilt ball went out about a week before the beginning of Lent and was then was the only topic of discussion among the city’s elite and wealthy … Invitations (about 1,200 were issued) were in great demand, even by such personages as Mrs.… Read more.

Sanitation

In New York City

The government of the city knew about the connection between poor health and poverty, and they knew too that the biggest part of the problem was the unsanitary conditions in tenement districts where almost all newly arrived immigrants found themselves. … Read more.